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UCLA School of Law History Archive: Legislative History

This guide provides an inventory of the Law Library's archive of resources relating to the history of the UCLA School of Law

Legislative History

In 1947, California legislation appropriated one million dollars to the UC Regents to build a law school facility at UCLA. Chapter 1557 of the Statutes of 1947 enacted Assembly Bill 1361.  AB 1361 was introduced as a result of a study by a Subcommittee on Higher Education that made recommendations for a new building for Hastings Law School and recommended that a law school be created in Southern California.  The overall effort was part of a massive state construction and expansion of services to respond to the end of World War II, as many GI’s decided to remain in California.  

A letter from State Senator Gerald O’Gara to Governor Earl Warren sought Warren’s approval of the bill with these words: “I know that at present many Southern Californians who desire first-class legal educations are forced to attend law schools in Northern California to secure them. The results are that a large number of Southern Californians either receive mediocre legal educations or are forced to spend a great deal of money which they cannot afford in order to attend the Northern California schools or private Southern California schools. I also believe that the Los Angeles Area deserves a State-operated law school.” Comments from the oral history of Rosenthal convey a similar sentiment.